Monday, August 1, 2016

"Citizenship and Agency Under Neoliberal Global Consumerism A Search for Informed Democratic Practices."

"Citizenship and Agency Under Neoliberal Global Consumerism A Search for Informed Democratic Practices."
 John Buschman

 Abstract
This article situates the ethics of information professionals within its contemporary public and political settings. An information ethics so contextualized can help promote the kinds of democratic and global citizenships that are the basis of this special issue of the Journal of Information Ethics. While this paper cannot fully canvas the issues raised, it can take us some way in balancing our perspective on the political issues packed inside the goals of an informed, global citizenry. It proposes a coherent network of concepts about the political context of the contemporary world by mapping its challenges. The article reviews the political and public content of the concepts of global and globalization, citizen and citizenship, and discusses the implied agency of the informed global citizen. It concludes with a discussion that draws out some of the broad responses to these contexts. The call for papers for the Information Ethics Roundtable 20¡4 conference describes global citizenship as the possession of “knowledges, skills and attitudes that make it possible … to be actively involved in local, national and global institutions and systems that directly or indirectly affect their lives” (University 38 Journal of Information Ethics, Spring 2016 Journal of Information Ethics / Volume 25, Number 1 / Spring 2016 / pp. 38–53 / ISSN 1061-9321 / eISBN 978-1-4766-2189-0 / © 2016 McFarland & Company, Inc.

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