Tuesday, February 11, 2020

“Democratic Librarianship: The Role of the Medical Library in Promoting Democracy and Social Justice.”

Russo Martin, Elaine. 2020. “Democratic Librarianship: The Role of the Medical Library in Promoting Democracy and Social Justice.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 108 (1): 131–36.

Evidence suggests that Erich Meyerhoff was one of the first practitioners of democratic librarianship throughout his long and productive life. This essay defines democratic librarianship in the context of democratic ideals and social justice and posits actions that the profession should be taking to thrive and lead in a multicultural environment, including being a place for active engagement, crucial conversations, and debate. Democratic librarianship is broader than social justice but incorporates social justice ideals in promoting a socially just and democratic society.

Thursday, December 26, 2019

Half a Million Tramps-W.A. Gape



The Kate Sharply Library has a review of  Half A Million Tramps” by Bill Gape (1936)  which constantly articulates the tension between what an individual tramp may feel to be their rights and what charity, religion and the state decide these rights actually are. In his world, Gape suggests, organized charity can prove to be a cruel and mean thing that suits the power of the giver more than the rights of the receiver.--review by Barry Pateman.

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Human Rights Day 2019

2019 Theme: Youth Standing Up for Human Rights

After a year marked by the 30th anniversary celebrations of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which culminated on 20 November, 2019, our plan is to capitalise on the current momentum and spotlight the leadership role of youth in collective movements as a source of inspiration for a better future.
Under our universal call to action "Stand Up for Human rights," we aim to celebrate the potential of youth as constructive agents of change, amplify their voices, and engage a broad range of global audiences in the promotion and protection of rights. The campaign, led by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), is designed to encourage, galvanise, and showcase how youth all over the world stand up for rights and against racism, hate speech, bullying, discrimination, and climate change, to name a few.

Saturday, November 30, 2019

PENNSYLVANIA STUDIES IN HUMAN RIGHTS-NEW BOOKS!



PENNSYLVANIA STUDIES IN HUMAN RIGHTS
Bert B. Lockwood, Series Editor.


  • Human Rights Education

  • Keys, The Ideals of Global Sport: From Peace to Human Rights (hc 2019, eb 2019).
  • Renshaw, Human Rights and Participatory Politics in Southeast Asia (hc 2019, eb 2019).
Joyful Human Rights





  • Miller/Roseman, Beyond Virtue and Vice: Rethinking Human Rights and Criminal Law (hc 2019, eb 2019).



  • Anaya-Muñoz/Frey, Mexico's Human Rights Crisis (hc 2019, eb 2018).


Destrooper/Merry, Human Rights Transformation in Practice (hc 2018, eb 2018).

Çubukçu, For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq (hc 2018, eb 2018).
P. C. Chang and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Roth, P. C. Chang and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (hc 2018, eb 2018).

Asare, Truth Without Reconciliation: A Human Rights History of Ghana (hc 2018, eb 2018).

von Staden, Strategies of Compliance with the European Court of Human Rights: Rational Choice
Within Normative Constraints (hc 2018, eb 2018).

David, Communists and Their Victims: The Quest for Justice in the Czech Republic (hc 2018, eb
2018).

Selby, Human Rights in Thailand (hc 2018, eb 2018)
Robben, Argentina Betrayed: Memory, Mourning, and Accountability (hc 2018, eb 2018).

Nowak, Torture: An Expert's Confrontation with an Everyday Evil (hc 2018)

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Appalachian Prison Book Project

Appalachian Prison Book Project (APBP)




Our work emanates from two interconnected premises: education is a basic human right, and engaging the community in educational justice efforts is a requisite component to building sustainable restorative justice models.
APBP mails free books to people imprisoned in six states: West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, and Maryland. We serve over 200 facilities in the region, and we receive around 100 requests per week. Since 2005, we have mailed over 30,000 books.
The book project is an all-volunteer, donation-based effort. Nearly every book we send has been donated to us and is housed in our work space at the Aull Center, a space generously provided by the Morgantown Public Library. A small army of dedicated volunteers opens letters, matches requests to books, and wraps books for mailing.
Book requests should be mailed to our post office box: APBP, PO Box 601, Morgantown, WV 26507. Appalachian Prison Book Project 



  1. 2019. Loera, Magenta; Gonzalez-Curci, Angela; Marciniak, Sophia “Prison Literacy, Banned Books, and the Right to Read.” Alki 35 (2): 21; (2018). 
  2. Millsap, Katie. Building Partnerships with Correctional Libraries. Texas Library Journal, 94(3), 79–80; 
  3. Hart, Andrew. 2017. “Prisons Need Books.” American Libraries 48 (3/4):8; 
  4. Rabina, Debbie; Drabinski, Emily; Paradise, Laurin. 2016. “Information Needs in Prisons and Jails: A Discourse Analytic Approach.” Libri: International Journal of Libraries & Information Services 66 (4): 291–302; 2015;
  5.  J, Amanda; John, St. “Public Libraries, County Jails: Best Ways to Break into Correctional Partnership.” Idaho Librarian, December, 1; 
  6. McCook,K. “Public Libraries and People in Jail.” Reference and User Services Quarterly 43 (Fall 2004): 26-30;
  7.  2000. Larry E. Sullivan.“The Least of Our Brethren: Library Service to Prisoners.” American Libraries 31 (5): 56–58.

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

“Writers Without Borders:Digital resources launch online for study of human rights

“Writers Without Borders: Creating Global Access to the PEN International and English PEN Records"


Thousands of digitized records reflecting major historical events of the 20th century related to PEN International, a global writers’ organization, are available online beginning this month. A project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and completed by the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has resulted in a new online finding aid for researchers, as well as access to teaching guides and nearly 5,000 digitized records.
Access the digitized records and teaching guides online at ransom.center/PEN.

Thursday, October 31, 2019

World Day for Audio Visual Heritage

World Day for Audiovisual Heritage27 October

Audiovisual archives tell us stories about people’s lives and cultures from all over the world. They represent a priceless heritage which is an affirmation of our collective memory and a valuable source of knowledge since they reflect the cultural, social and linguistic diversity of our communities. They help us grow and comprehend the world we all share. Conserving this heritage and ensuring it remains accessible to the public and future generations is a vital goal for all memory institutions as well as the public at large. 
Audiovisual archives tell us stories about people’s lives and cultures from all over the world. They represent a priceless heritage which is an affirmation of our collective memory and a valuable source of knowledge since they reflect the cultural, social and linguistic diversity of our communities. They help us grow and comprehend the world we all share. Conserving this heritage and ensuring it remains accessible to the public and future generations is a vital goal for all memory institutions as well as the public at large. The UNESCO Archives has launched the project ‘Digitizing our shared UNESCO history with this very goal in mind.
The World Day for Audiovisual Heritage (WDAH) is a commemoration of the adoption, in 1980 by the 21st General Conference, of the Recommendation for the Safeguarding and Preservation of Moving Images. The World Day provides an occasion to raise general awareness of the need to take urgent measures and to acknowledge the importance of audiovisual documents.
In this way, the World Day also serves as an opportunity for UNESCO’s Member States to evaluate their performance with respect to implementing the 2015 Recommendation Concerning the Preservation of, and Access to, Documentary Heritage, Including in Digital Form.
The WDAH fulfils UNESCO’s constitutional mandate to promote the "free flow of ideas by word and image" as a representation of our shared heritage and memory.  In so doing, the Day highlights the role of heritage in building the defenses of peace in people’s minds.